Check Out this Online Martial Law Museum Tailored for Filipino Millenials

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Dakila (Nobility) founded the first Digital Museum of the Martial Law period in the history of the Philippines. This is to address and respond to the obvious ignorance and misconceptions expressed by millenials on social media.

Dakila is a Philippine Collective for Modern Heroism. According to their website, they are a group of artists, students, and individuals committed to working together to creatively spark social consciousness formation towards social change.

An event timeline.

The museum offers a virtual tour and exploration of the Martial Law timeline beginning from former President Ferdinand Marcos’ ascent to be the highest public official of the Philippines in 1965.

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The virtual timeline starts with the video biography of Marcos called Iginuhit ng Tadhana (Written by Fate), which details the incredible paradigm of his presidential campaign against then incumbent president Diosdado Macapagal.

The timeline reveals the numbers, highlights, casualties and resistance from Marcos’ very first term, up to his third and last. It even details the peso-dollar rates during that time period, and the significant events that happened during Marcos’ long reign.

Some of the events that were recorded in chronological order in the museum’s timeline include the Beatlemania in Manila in July 4 to 5, 1966; the Manila Summit in October 24 to 25 in 1966; the formation of the New People’s Army in 1969; and Pope John Paul VI’s first visit to the Philippines in 1970.

The first grim event recorded in the timeline is dubbed as the Battle of Mendiola in 1970, where four student demonstrators turned up dead. This marks the start of the descent into one of the darkest periods in the history of the Philippines.

The next bloody event included in the timeline is the explosion at Plaza Miranda, which left 9 dead and 95 people wounded.

Backed by public records.

The Digital Museum of Martial Law aims to educate millenials about what really happened during Marcos’ reign by making it accessible to the public, and by relating factual public records through pictures and videos.

You can visit the museum here.

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Charlie Pelaez

A one-woman show. Peace. Love. Bacon. And all things geeky.

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